A Discussion on Concussion

I was going to write something about something and then it turned into nothing about nothing. So here I am just typing to type because my computer is on and the page is before me. The discussion was going to discuss the phenomena which is “Resolutions at the gym” and how proud I am of myself to have been going for 7 of the 11 days in 2016.

The issue I am having at the moment, is the words which were about those 7-days are just washing away in my head. I was up late last night, checking on my wife every couple of hours because she cracked her cranium hard last night on the “town’s ice skating pond”. The thing is atrocious! We were on it less than 10-minutes, before I said, “this is too scary for me as a newbie. Can we please go elsewhere?” And as we began to leave the ice slab, this is when she slipped backwards and fell. Cracking the back of her cranium on the solid-solid ice. I heard the “TH-WUMP!” and asked “are you alright?” She exhaled. Made a whimpering noise. No tears in her eyes. Just the pain that goes along with cracking ones’ cranium on a hard solid ground.

Back at the bench. Skates removed. We journeyed over to the local Tim Horton’s for a cup of Hot Cocoa. Before we headed for the next skating area. We spoke vaguely about her head. She felt alright. I checked her pupils. They were the same size. Eventually we skated for an hour. I kept asking for an update on her cracked cranium. She would not divulge just how bad it hurt. Her eyes gave way to the pain inside. After an hour of cardio on the nice smooth surface in Spruce Grove, we headed for home. That’s when the real, hurt began to spread. After we had stopped to rest.

Her face said it all.

brain-injury-lawyer-traumatic-brain-injuries-causes-and-symptoms-infographic

 

She explained her situation. How the back of her head hurt as well as a spot near her tailbone and she felt a little “cloudy” in her head. We sat and chatted about concussions. As I checked her pupils, to make sure they were the same size? Otherwise we were heading for the Emergency room at the local hospital. Sitting on our couch we tried to determine how many physical symptoms of a concussion she actually had?

  • Physical
    • Nausea and vomiting, not yet
    • Headache, definitely
    • Fuzzy or blurry vision, a little
    • Dizziness, no
    • Sensitivity to light or noise, yes
    • Balance problems, that’s a given – guess your concussed all the time! 
    • Feeling tired or having no energy, no

We knew there might be an issue with her going to sleep. So, I decided as the good husband to wake up every 2 to 3 hours and check on her. At first I couldn’t get to sleep. Shortly thereafter I did. And each time I woke up to check on her, I would look to see;

  • how she was breathing?
  • was it normal? yes
  • was it shallow? no
  • had she thrown up? no
  • was she losing any fluids out her mouth or ears? no and no
  • was I able to slightly wake her up? yes

By 08:00am, we were both awake. She said her head felt better. She didn’t feel as “cloudy” but still had a slight headache. I looked into her eyes. Pupils were the same. She did not act confused. Her blurry vision had gone away and the pain at the back of her head was still there.

It was then, I realized, that I did not have a enough sleep to get behind the wheel of my truck and drive 30-minutes to work. Instead, I played “hookey” for the morning. And went back to bed to catch up on some necessary zzz’s. While my wife ate her breakfast and got ready for the day ahead. As the day wore on: my wife’s conditions came and went. This is when she realized, it was time to call the doctor and schedule an appointment this week.

The random thing about concussions which we read last night, is the symptoms might not present themselves right a way. It might take a week, a month or in some cases a year, before the damage from cracking one’s cranium on the ground presents itself. The best way to combat a concussion, is to get yourself to the doctor for a check up on your particular situation. And have the doc perform an x-ray or MRI of your head. So, you can get the correct medical treatment sooner rather than later.